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Snapshot of Survival: A Photographic Journey of the Endangered Turtle Crossing the Road

Capturing the moment a snapping turtle crosses a road is a special privilege. This slow-moving, special concern species faces numerous challenges on its journey, including the risk of getting hit by a vehicle. As a #conservationist and #photographer, I was determined to capture this momentous occasion and raise awareness about the important role we play in protecting these specially protected reptiles.

I happened to encounter this biggie crossing the road. I noticed that and slowed down, stopped my car to make sure it didn't get trampled by other vehicles. As I waited, I couldn't help but think about the challenges this species faces.


Snapping turtles are listed as a Specially Protected Reptile under the Ontario Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act, due to their vulnerable populations and the importance of their role in the ecosystem. I was reminded of the responsibility we all have to protect these creatures and their habitats.

Finally, I saw a glimpse of the turtle making its way across the road. I was awed by its slow, steady pace as it moved steadily forward. Despite the risk of danger, the turtle was determined to reach its destination. I snapped multiple shots, capturing the turtle's journey from start to finish. I waited till it advanced into the woods.


As I reviewed the images, I was struck by the beauty and majesty of this endangered species. The fog and the quiet surroundings added to the serenity of the scene, making the images even more poignant. I was proud to have captured this moment and to have played a small role in raising awareness about the importance of conservation and the protection of these special reptiles.


The images I captured that day serve as a reminder of the incredible journey that these creatures undertake and the challenges they face. No one can deny the impact a photograph can have, and I hope these images will inspire others to take action in the conservation of these amazing animals.


Location: Silvercreek Conservation Area


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